Category Archives: performance

Compare sorting algorithms in C#, article 5 of 5

Countingsort The discussion of Quicksort in my previous post mentions that the fastest possible sorting algorithms that use comparisons take on the order of N * log(N) steps. Countingsort does not use comparisons so it is not bound by that … Continue reading

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Compare sorting algorithms in C#, part 4 of 5

Quicksort Quicksort is a recursive algorithm that uses a divide-and-conquer technique. While the list of items to be sorted contains at least two items, Quicksort divides it into two sublists and recursively calls itself to sort the sublists. The Quicksort … Continue reading

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Compare sorting algorithms in C#, part 3 of 5

Selectionsort Selectionsort is a very simple algorithm. First you search the list for the smallest item. Then you swap that item with the item at the top of the list. Next you find the second smallest item and swap it … Continue reading

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Compare sorting algorithms in C#, part 2 of 5

Bubblesort Bubblesort is a specialized algorithm designed for sorting items that are already mostly in sorted order. If only one or two items in your list are out of order, Bubblesort is very fast. If the items in your list … Continue reading

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Compare sorting algorithms in C#, post 1 of 5

This post begins a series of articles about sorting algorithms. Much of the text originally appeared in the December 1995 issue of Visual Basic Developer magazine, a publication that seems to no longer exist. All of these posts include the … Continue reading

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Compare the performance of incrementing statements in C#

This is another performance testing post. Assembly language usually has statements comparable to x++, x–, x +=, and other operators that add or subtract to a value and store the result in the same value, so it makes some sense … Continue reading

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Compare the performance of string comparison methods in C#

This example uses the following code to make four strings: string value0 = “AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA”; string value1 = “AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA”; string value2 = “AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAB”; string value3 = “BAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA”; It then uses several methods for comparing the first string with the others. For … Continue reading

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Compare the performance of switch and if statements in C#

This example compares the performance of switch and if-else statements. Both do roughly the same thing: they check a series of conditions until they find one that is true and then skip the rest. This example compares the speeds of … Continue reading

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Compare loop performance in C#

The Code Project post FOREACH Vs. FOR (C#) examines the IL code created for a C# foreach loop and a for loop to compare loop performance. The author notices some unnecessary statements in the foreach loop and therefore concludes that … Continue reading

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Study WPF 3D performance in C#

The example Make a stellate geodesic sphere with WPF and C# makes a pretty complicated shape so I was wondering about the performance provided by WPF 3D programs. This example makes a group of stellate spheres using WPF 3D. See … Continue reading

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