Category Archives: algorithms

Use statement lambdas in C#

The example Use lambda expressions in C# showed how to use lambda expressions to concisely create an anonymous method that takes parameters and returns a value. The following code shows one of the lambda expressions that example used. private void … Continue reading

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Use lambda expressions in C#

Lambda expressions are basically just a shorthand notation for making an anonymous method. There are a couple of formats, the simplest of which has the following syntax. x => expression Here expression is an expression involving the variable x. For … Continue reading

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Use anonymous methods in C#

My previous post Use the predefined Action, Func, and EventHandler delegate types in C# explains how to use the predefined generic Func, Action, and EventHandler delegate types to graph four functions F(x, y). It uses the following code to define … Continue reading

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Use the predefined Action, Func, and EventHandler delegate types in C#

This and the next couple of posts discuss delegates and the somewhat related topics of anonymous methods and lambda expressions. Briefly, delegate types are programmer-defined data types that represent methods. For example, the following code declares a delegate type. // … Continue reading

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Linkback to the Secret Santa Problem

Tom left a comment to my post Calculate the number of secret Santa permutations in C#. He used that example to build a site in JavaScript explaining how the algorithm works. It’s a pretty cool little page. Drop by and … Continue reading

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Make a dice-rolling simulation in C#

This example performs a simulation of rolling two six-sided dice. It’s related to my book Interview Puzzles Dissected, which includes several examples that involve rolling dice. When you enter a number of trials and click Roll, the program uses the … Continue reading

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Draw the Weierstrass function in C#

The Weierstrass function was discovered by Karl Weierstrass in 1872. It’s an odd function that is continuous everywhere but differentiable nowhere. I’ll explain what that means shortly. Here’s the function: Here: The following two sections explain what it means to … Continue reading

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Calculate Fibonacci numbers in several ways in C#

For some background on Fibonacci numbers and φ, see Examine the relationship between the Fibonacci sequence and phi in C#. This example shows several ways to calculate Fibonacci numbers. While this is mostly for curiosity’s sake, this example does demonstrate … Continue reading

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Recursively draw equations in C#

The basic idea for recursively drawing equations is simple. Well, sort of simple. Classes represent different kinds of equations. A particular class knows how to draw its kind of equation. It uses other classes to draw its pieces. For example, … Continue reading

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Book Errata Page: The C# Helper Top 100

This is the errata page for my book The C# Helper Top 100, The 100 most popular posts at csharphelper.com. If you find mistakes, please post them here in the Leave a Reply box at the bottom of the page. … Continue reading

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